We highly recommend enabling JavaScript for the best experience. You can find detailed instructions for your browser at enable-javascript.com.

Center for Energy, Environment & Sustainability

Research & Scholarly Activities

How CEES impacts the world

Center for Energy, Environment & Sustainability

Sustainability Clinic

Helping communities reach sustainability goals

Center for Energy, Environment & Sustainability

Funding Opportunities

CEES supports scholarly activities

Center for Energy, Environment & Sustainability

Sustainability Graduate Programs

Sustainability Graduate Programs



Five Golden Rings … and an Environmental Dilemma

Five Golden Rings … and an Environmental Dilemma

December 18, 2018 by Kim McGrath | mcgratka@wfu.edu  & Alicia Roberts | media@wfu.edu Gold jewelry on your holiday shopping list? Before you buy that special someone a statement piece this season, scientists studying climate change and the fate of the world’s vital rainforests ask you to consider some hidden consequences. The demand for gold is polluting one of the…

As the Climate Changes, So Will the Galápagos

As the Climate Changes, So Will the Galápagos

This morning, a front-page story in the digital New York Times was swimming with interactive imagery of marine species in the Galápagos Islands and expertise from Wake Forest biologist and CEES affiliate, Dr. Dave J. Anderson. Since the 1980’s, Dr. Anderson has studied the Blue-Footed Booby, a seabird that finds its home on these islands and…

COP24: World Nations Gather to Grapple with Looming Climate Disaster

COP24: World Nations Gather to Grapple with Looming Climate Disaster

By Justin Catanoso, CEES Faculty Affiliate and Professor of Journalism at Wake Forest University. Representatives from nearly 200 nations gathered in Katowice, Poland on Sunday for COP24, the annual meeting of the Conference of the Parties, to move forward on climate action. The goal: keep global temperatures from rising less than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6…

Rainforest Destruction from Gold Mining Hits All-Time High in Peru

Rainforest Destruction from Gold Mining Hits All-Time High in Peru

By Wake Forest University Communications & External Relations Katie Neal (’03) and Alicia Roberts  (WINSTON-SALEM, NC, November 8, 2018) – Small-scale gold mining has destroyed more than 170,000 acres of primary rainforest in the Peruvian Amazon in the past five years, according to a new analysis by scientists at Wake Forest University’s Center for Amazonian Scientific Innovation…

Reforesting the Amazon, a Live Interview with the BBC World Service

Reforesting the Amazon, a Live Interview with the BBC World Service

As of 2017, thirty-eight percent of Peru’s forests were lost to deforestation due to gold mining in the area. But there is hope. Wake Forest researchers have developed newfound ways to reforest and heal the soil that is left poisoned by mercury. “What we’ve had to do is figure out how to make trees grow…

  • Five Golden Rings … and an Environmental Dilemma

    December 18, 2018 by Kim McGrath | mcgratka@wfu.edu  & Alicia Roberts | media@wfu.edu Gold jewelry on your holiday shopping list? Before you buy that special someone a statement piece this season, scientists studying climate change and the fate of the world’s vital rainforests ask you to consider some hidden consequences. The demand for gold…

  • As the Climate Changes, So Will the Galápagos

    This morning, a front-page story in the digital New York Times was swimming with interactive imagery of marine species in the Galápagos Islands and expertise from Wake Forest biologist and CEES affiliate, Dr. Dave J. Anderson. Since the 1980’s, Dr. Anderson has studied the Blue-Footed Booby, a seabird that finds its…

  • COP24: World Nations Gather to Grapple with Looming Climate Disaster

    By Justin Catanoso, CEES Faculty Affiliate and Professor of Journalism at Wake Forest University. Representatives from nearly 200 nations gathered in Katowice, Poland on Sunday for COP24, the annual meeting of the Conference of the Parties, to move forward on climate action. The goal: keep global temperatures from rising less…